Sunday, November 1, 2009

SV650 Chain and Sprocket Replacement

New chain and sprocketsThis documents replacing the chain, front sprocket, and rear sprocket on my first gen 2001 SV650. I also decided to change the gearing from the stock 15/45 (front/rear sprocket teeth) to a 15/47. The change lowers the gearing and makes the bike accelerate faster by sacrificing top speed. The larger rear sprocket also requires a longer chain.

I purchased the chain and sprockets as a kit from Sprocket Center. The chain is a D.I.D 525VM2 gold X’ring with 112 links (stock is 110). I didn’t like the gold chain at first, but it has grown on me. The sprockets are 525 Drive Systems Superlite steel.

Tools used for this project:All the tools used in the job

Steps:

  1. Lift the rear tire off the ground. I used a rear stand supporting the SV on the swing arm.
  2. Remove the front sprocket cover with the 8mm socket. Set the cover and three bolts aside. IMGP5802 IMGP5804
  3. Remove the clutch release mechanism with a 10mm socket and unhook it from the clutch cable. There is not need to remove the cable.
    IMGP5807 IMGP5809 IMGP5810
  4. Use the hammer and flathead screwdriver to bend the tabs on the sprocket nut retaining washer back, so the bolt can turn freely.
    IMGP5813
  5. If you have frame sliders, remove the one on the left side of the bike with a 17mm socket. This will give the breaker bar room to work. You could skip this step if you have an impact wrench.
    IMGP5819
  6. With the 32mm socket, breaker bar, and 4’ pipe extension or 32mm socket and impact wrench loosen the front sprocket bolt. I highly recommend an impact wrench here. You will also likely need to have someone stand on the rear brake to prevent things from spinning. Some people recommend leaving the bike in neutral to avoid straining the transmission; I found I needed the bike in first gear to help keep things from moving as I tried to loosen the front sprocket bolt. I used both PB Blaster and Liquid Wrench to no affect trying to get the bolt loose with the breaker bar. Use an impact wrench!
    IMGP5821
  7. Remove the front sprocket nut and washer
    IMGP5822IMGP5824
  8. Remove the chain cover with the Philips screwdriver
    IMGP5818
  9. Remove the cotter pin on the rear axle bolt with the pliers
    IMGP5825
  10. Loosen the rear axle bolt with the 22mm socket and breaker bar.
    IMGP5827 IMGP5830
  11. Use the allen wrench to loosen the chain adjusters all the way.
    IMGP5831
  12. Push the rear wheel forward to get all the chain slack possible.
    IMGP5832
  13. Pull the chain off the rear sprocket and hang it over the rear swing arm.
    IMGP5834
  14. Pull the axle out towards the exhaust side.
    IMGP5835 IMGP5837
  15. Put the rear tire down on something soft (carpet) with the rotor side down, so the sprocket is facing up.
    IMGP5836
  16. Remove the five nuts on the rear sprocket with the 14mm socket and breaker bar.
    IMGP5841 IMGP5842
  17. Remove the rear sprocket
    IMGP5843
  18. The new sprocket compared to the old one:
    IMGP5845 IMGP5846 IMGP5847
  19. This is a good time to really clean the rear tire. A microfiber cloth and WD40 easily take care of the grime.
    before:IMGP5848
    after:IMGP5849
  20. Pull the sprocket coupling off the axle top like shown and add some axle grease.
    IMGP5851 IMGP5853
  21. Replace the coupling and put the new rear sprocket on. Torque the rear sprocket nuts to 60 Nm.
    IMGP5857
  22. Slide the chain off the front sprocket and remove the front sprocket.
    IMGP5858
  23. Front sprocket old and new compared:
    IMGP5859
  24. Use the dremel and metal cutting disc to cut the chain off the bike. Cut the links, not the rivets. It should cut quite quickly. Use the safety goggles here as there will be hunks of flying hot metal.
    cutting the old chain off with a dremel cutting the old chain off with a dremel IMGP5867
  25. The cut chain should look like this:
    IMGP5868
  26. This is very embarrassing:
    one messed up chain these links don't move
  27. Install the new front sprocket
    IMGP5871
  28. This is also a great time to clean the swing arm
    IMGP5872
  29. Grease the rear axle
    IMGP5874
  30. Reinstall the rear axle, axle spacers, and rear wheel. Mine slipped in easily, but if it sticks, give the axle a couple taps from a rubber mallet or a chunk of wood.
    IMGP5873
  31. My chain adjustment bolts were corroded and stripped, so I went to the hardware store and purchased two new ones:
    stripped head IMGP5882
  32. The new D.I.D. 525VM2 112 link chain
    IMGP5878 IMGP5879
  33. Wrap the chain around the new sprockets. I found it easiest to keep the master link on the top.
    IMGP5897
  34. With the chain tool, press the master link together
    IMGP5898 IMGP5899 IMGP5900 IMGP5902
  35. Change the press plate to the rivet head on the chain tool, and mushroom the rivet heads out.
    IMGP5903 IMGP5905 IMGP5907
  36. The tool should be flush like this before adding pressure on the rivets
    Riveting master link materlink riveted
  37. Torque the front sprocket nut to 145 Nm and bend the lock washer around one face of the sprocket nut.
  38. Adjust the chain slack with the ruler. It should be 20-30mm with the bike on the side stand.
  39. Adjust the chain tighteners until the chain is flows straight front to back. A chain alignment tool really helps with this job.
  40. Torque the rear axle nut to 65 Nm and replace the cotter pin
  41. Reinstall the clutch release mechanism and front sprocket cover.
  42. I found it necessary to also readjust the clutch lever free play after moving things around. It should be 10-15mm and the clutch release mechanism screw (in the center) should be turned 1/4 turn out.
  43. Check the chain slack after 50 miles and again after another 200.
  44. Enjoy your new chain and sprockets!

Finished with new chain and two new sprockets

22 comments:

  1. Chris:

    Excellent write up. When I had a new chain installed on my SV K4, all of my sprockets were still okay and did not need replacing. I only needed the chain but as I was having my new Michelin Pilots installed the rear wheel was off anyway so I only paid for the chain.

    bob
    bobskoot: wet coast scootin

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  2. I must agree your article is very helpful and i saved some $$$ when i needed to order a new chain and sprocket kit for my sv650S... thanks again for the writeup!!!

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  3. Thanks Anonymous. I'm glad I could help!

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  4. Excellent write up! I had to replace my chain,sprockets, and clutch push rod actuator and doing all of your steps saved me some serious shop labor. Thanks again!

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  5. Joey B: Glad you found it useful! I hope you enjoy your new setup as much as I did. I am about to put on another new chain and sprocket. The set above lasted about 16,000 miles or so.

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  6. Very nice write up! I'm about to purchase the same kit - 15/47 with DID gold xring chain. My first sprocket and chain replacement on the SV. Thanks for the easy to follow step-by-step instructions.

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  7. Susan: I'm glad you found it useful. I just used myself to put on the replacement kit for the above. The chain lasted about 17,000 miles of neglect. I went on a long trip in 2010 and didn't lube it for about 5,000+ miles. Sprockets were in good shape with the rear just starting to get a couple points. I replaced it with the same kit.

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  8. Hey thanks for writing this up!
    I have an impact wrench and it is not able to budge the front sprocket nut. I may have to go get a breaker bar and try that. Murphy was working against me last night, I can't even get the frame slide off the bike. I did find that it helps if you put a piece of wood through the rear wheel and wedge it against the swing arms in order to keep it from moving while you try to turn the nut. It isn't a reverse thread is it?

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  9. Hey thanks for writing this up!
    I have an impact wrench and it is not able to budge the front sprocket nut. I may have to go get a breaker bar and try that. Murphy was working against me last night, I can't even get the frame slide off the bike. I did find that it helps if you put a piece of wood through the rear wheel and wedge it against the swing arms in order to keep it from moving while you try to turn the nut. It isn't a reverse thread is it?

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  10. Jade: You're welcome! Put some liquid wrench or pb blaster and let it sit over night. then hit it with the impact again. the impact wrench is stronger than the breaker bar. a helper on the rear brake helps too :)

    it is not reverse threaded! loosen it by turning counter-clockwise as normal.

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  11. Well, the use of a little PB Blaster, combined with a better impact wrench, and a little more pressure won the battle. The Front sprocket nut is now free. All of the other steps went pretty smooth except for the bike shop giving me the wrong chain and front Sprocket. I wonder if PB blaster would work on them :)

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  12. Jade: Awesome! I'm glad you were able to get it free. They get it so tight from the factory. The next time will be easier.

    I have trouble with my local shops too! let me know if the PB blaster works on them! LOL :)

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  13. Well you just helped yet another SV owner. Excellent write-up, pics were very helpful. Much appreciated. Happy riding!

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  14. Why did you use a 112 link chain? Don't first gen SV's use 110?

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    Replies
    1. Eric: Yes, 110 is stock. I used 112 because I changed the gearing which I mentioned in the first two paragraphs :)

      "I also decided to change the gearing from the stock 15/45 (front/rear sprocket teeth) to a 15/47. The change lowers the gearing and makes the bike accelerate faster by sacrificing top speed. The larger rear sprocket also requires a longer chain.

      I purchased the chain and sprockets as a kit from Sprocket Center. The chain is a D.I.D 525VM2 gold X’ring with 112 links (stock is 110)."

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  15. As everyone else has said, "thanks!" I will refer to this when I replace my chain and sprockets this weekend; wish I had this handy when I replaced my chain a few years ago.

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  16. Dumb question, if the rear part of the bike is already disassembled, aka, wheel and tire is off so thus no rear brake, any suggestions or thoughts on if it's possible to get front sprocket nut off? Thanks!!!

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    Replies
    1. Good question. Since you are replacing the chain anyways, you could wrap the chain around something solid like a 2x4 and use that to hold the front sprocket in place while you loosen it with an impact wrench. Maybe brace it against the rear swingarm or frame. good luck!

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    2. Hmm, good idea. I saw some online postings of stuffing a screwdriver thru the chain, but that would have to press up against the bike somewhere for friction. I like the 2x4 idea better. I think I could use the swingarm to be used to brace the board against. I'm planning to tackle this, this week/weekend sometime so I'll let you know how it goes. Thanks for the outside of the box thoughts!!

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  17. Hey man, I can't tell you how helpful this step-by-step process is. Really appreciate it! I took your advice and borrowed an impact wrench, after about a half hour of struggling with that front sprocket.

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