Saturday, June 5, 2010

GS500 Handlebar Replacement

This documents installing new BikeMaster Daytona Bars and Progrip 723 Gel grips on my 2007 Suzuki GS500.
Tools Used:
gs500 handlebar replacement
The new bars over the old bars:
gs500 handlebar replacement gs500 handlebar replacement
1) Put the bike on the center stand and put a blanket over the tank to protect it from scratches and the carb cleaner.
gs500 handlebar replacement
2) Remove the bar ends with a Philips screwdriver. By loosening the screw slightly and wiggling the bar end out. Don't loosen the screw all the way or the nut on the inside will fall off inside the bar.
gs500 handlebar replacement gs500 handlebar replacement
3) If you want to reuse your grips, shoot a small amount of carb cleaner under them. This will break up the adhesive holding them on and makes it very easy to slide the grips off the bars. You can also use the razor to slit them down the side. Slide the grips off.
gs500 handlebar replacementgs500 handlebar replacementgs500 handlebar replacementgs500 handlebar replacement
4) Disconnect the two small cables on both the brake housing and the clutch housing.
gs500 handlebar replacement gs500 handlebar replacement
5) Remove the two black screws holding on both switch housings with the Philips screwdriver. Remove the switch housings from the bars.
gs500 handlebar replacement gs500 handlebar replacement gs500 handlebar replacementgs500 handlebar replacement gs500 handlebar replacement gs500 handlebar replacement
6) Slide the throttle tube off the bars
gs500 handlebar replacement
7) Using the 8mm socket and wrench loosen the bolt holding the lever mounts/mirrors, and remove them from the bars.
gs500 handlebar replacement gs500 handlebar replacement gs500 handlebar replacement
8) Pry the little caps off of the handlebar clamps with a thin screwdriver.
gs500 handlebar replacementgs500 handlebar replacement
9) Remove the hex bolts with the 6mm wrench and remove the bar clamps.
gs500 handlebar replacementgs500 handlebar replacement
10) Remove the bars from the bike
gs500 handlebar replacement
11) Put the new bars into the clamps and tighten slightly. Measure each side of the bars to make sure they are even. I had each side at 13.25 inches.
gs500 handlebar replacement
12) With the 13/64” drill bit, drill a hole about 6.5 inches from each end of the bar. The hole will be the top of the switch housing, so locate in a comfortable position. Using the hammer and punch to make a small dent in the bars before drilling makes them easier to drill as the bit is less likely to wander.
gs500 handlebar replacement gs500 handlebar replacement  gs500 handlebar replacement gs500 handlebar replacement
13) Put the lever perches/mirror mounts back onto the bars.
gs500 handlebar replacement
14) Put the switch housings back on the bars. The hole in the bars matches up with the bump on the top, inside of the housing.
gs500 handlebar replacementgs500 handlebar replacement
15) Put the throttle tube back on the bars
gs500 handlebar replacement
16) Pry the end cap from the bars to make room for the bar ends.
gs500 handlebar replacement
17) The new Progrip gel grips. The larger diameter hole is the throttle side.
gs500 handlebar replacementgs500 handlebar replacement gs500 handlebar replacement
18) Cut the end off the grips to make room for the bar end weights with the side cutter or razor blade.
gs500 handlebar replacementgs500 handlebar replacement
19) Put the grips onto the bike with some grip adhesive or hair spray. Both will make the grips easy to slide on and hold them in place.
20) Put the bar end weights back on the bike
21) Adjust the bars and levers to the desired angles and tighten everything up.
22) Go for a test ride!

Before:
gs500 handlebar replacement
After:
gs500 handlebar replacement
New (top) and Old (bottom) bars together:
gs500 handlebar replacement

9 comments:

  1. Dear Chris:

    While you made this project seem like a logical progression of intuitive steps, it was still somewhat beyond me. I recently replaced a fuel pump on my K-75. I got the new pump, arranged my tools accordingly, read the Clymer Manual, then swiped my Amex card. The job was complete 40 minutes later.

    Pretty amazing for me, huh?

    Fondest regards,
    Jack • reep • Toad
    Twisted Roads

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  2. Very NICE tutorial, Chris... Everyone should be thankful for your contributions, keep up the incredible work!

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  3. Jack: Jobs like this aren't for everyone. I started doing things like this because I couldn't afford to pay someone. For me, the biggest thing is to just do it with confidence and not be afraid. This is much easier now that I have more than one bike. I'm not worried about breaking something I can't fix immediately impacting my ability to ride. I can take the time to go slow, reading my shop manuals and researching online if necessary.

    Amazing that you swiped your Amex and not someone elses?? :) :) I need to catch up on your blog, but I can't do it while at work anymore. Maybe I can read it on my phone...

    Bash3r: Thank you! Your great write up of the HighwayDirtBike install inspired me. (I still need to order mine!)

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  4. Hi Chris and thank you for the great write up.

    Are your old (looks like type 2 suburban machinery) handlebars available for sale by any chance?

    Cheers,

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  5. Louis-Guillaume: You're welcome. They are the type 2 suburban machinery bars. I wasn't planning on selling them now, but I would entertain a reasonable offer. Send me an email via the contact link above.

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  6. Thank you do much for this!!! Followed all the steps and get it done within 40min

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  7. Hi
    Thanks for the vids and pic. What are the name of the handlebars taht you are replacing? i have been looking for those kind of handle bars for my gs500 f. Can you tell where you have bought them?+ thanks

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    Replies
    1. thanks for stopping by. The name of the bars is in the first sentence of the post along with a link to the amazon page where I bought them.

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